The long-lasting solution to the refuge crisis?: The perfect refugee camp

Please send this article about the perfect, luxurious refugee camp that costs only 142 USD per refugee per month to your politicians and media.

The camp provides safety, food, kindergartens, schools, washing machine, sowing shops, work shops, and the basis for an internal, liberal businesses for only  2 million USD per month for 14,000 refugees (142 USD per refugee per month). This might be the kind of solution the world needs.

The collected yearly aid to developing countries is 120 billion US dollars (in 2007). For this amount alone, 70 million people could get conditions like in the Kilis camp for a whole year. If we add the money that is spent for accommodating refugees here in the West, I would think that the problem is solved. And the West would benefit from not having terrorists, criminals, and un-integratable refugees flooding our countries.

Building such refugee camps in the 3rd world might be part of a more long-lasting solution for the ongoing migrant crisis.

Via New York Times:

“Many of the world’s displaced live in conditions striking for their wretchedness, but what is startling about Kilis is how little it resembles the refugee camp of our imagination. It is orderly, incongruously so. Residents scan a card with their fingerprints for entry, before they pass through metal detectors and run whatever items they’re carrying through an X-ray machine. Inside, it’s stark: 2,053 identical containers spread out in neat rows. No tents. None of the smells — rotting garbage, raw sewage — usually associated with human crush and lack of infrastructure. …

There were other luxuries. Power lines, and at least as many streetlights as you would find in a nice suburban neighborhood. Multiple playgrounds that look like McDonald’s PlayPlaces. Containers housing maintenance men who can fix electric or plumbing problems. Fire hydrants. …

Several large structures housed the camp’s schools. The first was the Olive Preschool and Kindergarten. …

(At the entrance to Kilis)
(At the entrance to Kilis)

“It’s the nicest refugee camp in the world!” a Polish diplomat staying at my hotel crowed when I mentioned the place to him the next day. Standing with him was an Italian official; he nodded vehemently in agreement. No one I spoke to — not the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, not academics, not even the refugees — denies that the standard of living here is exceptionally high. When I later listed the amenities to a refugee expert, she replied, “I’ve never heard of such a thing.”…

14,000 residents

Rouba Bakri, 30, has been at Kilis since 2012. “It’s perfect,” she told me, after she invited me into her home. It is a 23-by-10-foot trailer with three rooms, like every other trailer. The front door is lockable. The bathroom is serviced by its own plumbing and hot-water tank; the kitchen is equipped with both a refrigerator and a stove. In the living room, long cushions and pillows were propped against the walls, and from a color TV in the corner blared the Cartoon Network. When I asked Bakri how many channels she had, she laughed and said: “So, so many. A thousand?” …

(A makeshift cafe and bird store)
(A makeshift cafe and bird store)

Twelve people live in Bakri’s container. Her husband, her husband’s parents, her three children, her husband’s three brothers, one of whom has a son, and a nephew. …

To keep busy, Bakri works as the unpaid manager of the camp’s laundry centers. Each camp section has one; families can drop off laundry twice a week and pick it up soon after, cleaned, free of charge. “It’s good,” said a 44-year-old Syrian volunteer named Malak Jamal, who works in the laundry of Section C, where she lives. “There are no problems.” Then she added, “The whole camp is good.” Behind the laundry room is an activities center. One room has 10 enormous looms; the Turks provide cotton and weaving lessons. Another houses a sewing workshop — it was packed when I visited — and yet another functions as a beauty salon. …

(Residents of Kilis inside their container)
(Residents of Kilis inside their container)

Perhaps nothing encapsulates that work so well as the way the Turks supply refugees with food. At Kilis, there are three grocery stores, side by side like a mini strip mall. Every family is given a debit card when they register, and every month, they get a balance of 80 Turkish lira, close to $40, per person for food and $10 per person for sundries. Inside the grocery stores are undulating produce sections, meat counters, dry-goods shelves and refrigerated dairy cases. At the checkout, refugees swipe their cards and show their IDs. “What do you think?” I asked Ajouz, my translator, as we toured the markets. “It’s better than a grocery store in Syria,” he mumbled. …

(The containers have three rooms, with hot-water tanks and separate plumbing in the bathrooms)
(The containers have three rooms, with hot-water tanks and separate plumbing in the bathrooms)
(A well-stocked supermarket in the camp)
(A well-stocked supermarket in the camp)
(A store outside one of the containers. Many residents have set up businesses in the camp)
(A store outside one of the containers. Many residents have set up businesses in the camp)

While rape is an epidemic in many camps, at Nizip I, Aboud said, she didn’t worry about it: “There’s guards everywhere. At night, the lights are like daylight. I can go out alone at 4 a.m., 3 a.m.” …

Expenditures at the Kilis camp run to at least $2 million a month.

Other refugees in Kilis, who are not allowed to work outside the camp, have also started businesses of some kind. There are canary stores, falafel stands, bicycle-repair shops and tea shops. There is a tent-size department store selling clothes, glasses and rugs; a coat shop; a jeans shop; a general store; a little joint with two slushy machines churning in two colors (red and orange); a tiny gaming cafe with three computers…”

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5 Comments

  1. This would be an ideal solution to relieve Europe from this invasion during the next year (2016), and the years after it, because sadly this year has already been lost.

  2. They should build these camps for them in Antarctica. They can have all the sharia laws they want.

  3. Have spent 37 years serving Canada’s Military, I think that these camps quite nice. I have seen the refugee camps when I was in the Balkans back in the mid 90’s serving with the UN then. And believe me they were not like these by a long shot. S build them back in Muslim countries and migrate the refugees there. The will not have learn a new language, the can have their own schools and there will not be a tax burden on any of us.

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